What's Cristina Wilson Reading?

We asked the Chief Operating Officer of the Charlotte Agenda what she reads when she isn't writing, working or taking care of her toddler. She shared the titles on her current list:

I've always been a voracious fiction reader – and I prefer to write fiction – but when I take a look at my real-life nightstand, I am in a major nonfiction sprint right now! In year three with Charlotte Agenda, I still read books focused on the startup life and entrepreneurship, and a few selections here reflect my goal of integrating more creativity into my day-to-day.

The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity, by Julia Cameron. This was recommended to me by a college friend who is a full-time freelance writer. The exercises are enlightening, even if you pick and choose and don't work through the entire course at once time.

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing The Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant To Be, by Rachel Hollis. I'm a big fan of Rachel's. Her very first book, Party Girl, was sent to me for review during my tenure at Carolina Bride magazine, and I've followed her on social media since then. It has been so cool to see her career explode (GWYF is a #1 NYT bestseller!), and the book itself has several powerful takeaways.

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, by Greg McKeown. For those who are a slave to "inbox zero" or who let other people's priorities trump your own, this is a must-read. Period.

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fearby Elizabeth Gilbert. I flew through this manifesto on creative living, as I know many people did. I love the way she characterizes the fear that is inevitable with creative pursuits.

Designing Your Life: How To Build A Well-lived, Joyful Life, by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans. I heard Bill's TEDx talk on the same topic and had to get the book immediately. I especially love the wisdom around how to make choices, commit, and move on.

Small Giantsby Bo Burlingham. I work for a brand that fits in this category – tiny but mighty. Should we purposefully stay that way? It's a fascinating look at companies who have chosen to stay small and why.

Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us, by Seth Godin. As a marketer, I love Seth Godin and have read almost all of his books. This one spoke to me recently as I think about the Agenda audience as a 'tribe' and our team as the leader. How can we continue to inspire, inform, entertain and connect them?